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Gift Planning

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Robby Rob


Grant WilkinsGrant Wilkins (BA ’47)

Grant Wilkins (BA ’47) has dedicated his life to eradicating polio. For more than two decades he...

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Jon KrausJon Kraus

Jon Kraus joined University Advancement in March 2015. Jon is Director of Development...

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Ruth KleinRuth Klein (MA ’55)

Ruth Klein (MA ’55) and her late husband, Roy (BFA ’52; MA ’55), never had a conventional family...

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WhittemoreDan and Beth Whittemore

For Dan and Beth Whittemore, exploring Native American culture was always an important part...

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HechtJames L. "Jim" Hecht and Amy Blatchford Hecht

For more than 60 years, James L. "Jim" Hecht and Amy Blatchford Hecht have believed in the power of...

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Robert “Bob” Jones and Dixie Savio-JonesRobert Jones and Dixie Savio-Jones

Robert “Bob” Jones (BFA ’52) and Dixie Savio-Jones have many passions—art and art collecting...
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Clayton and Christine PowersClayton and Christine Powers

For Clayton and Christine Powers, setting up a scholarship was really about paying it forward...
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Robby RobRobby and Barbara Robb

The DU’s intensified focus on science, technology, engineering and math education makes perfect sense to Robby Robb, a DU alumnus and former engineer.
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Bob and Vicki Grays' StoryBob and Vicki Grays

As our last living parent passed away, it occurred to us that our sun is also sinking in the western sky.
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Cynthia Shaw Simonoff (BM '77)Cynthia Shaw Simonoff 

I went to DU as a shy, but determined piano major. I had done a lot of choral and...
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John Lyons' University of Denver ExperienceJohn Lyons

Before graduation from high school I ran away and joined the U.S. Marine Corps. During the ensuing five years...
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Archived


Bill Stolfus and Ann Richardson share an ear for music and a love for DUBill Stolfus and Ann Richardson 

Bill Stolfus (BSBA 1956, MBA 1964) and Ann Richardson (BA 1956) met...
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Alyssa YangAlyssa Yang

During my freshman year, I had the opportunity to volunteer at Clínica Tepeyac, a local clinic in North Denver...
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Ciara FernandezCiara Fernandez

I am a second year law student focusing on Human Rights, including child advocacy, Indigenous Rights and Health law.
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D.J. CloseD.J. Close

D.J. Close found a whole new world at DU. Growing up in the small town of Durango, Colorado...
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Elizabet "Liz" CovarrubiasElizabet "Liz" Covarrubias

Graduated in 2010 with a Masters in Social Work, in the Community Practice Track.
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Adriana Govea, BA '10 and Kiki AndrianiAdriana Govea and Kiki Andriani

My goal when I enrolled at The Women's College was to become an educated woman, improve my financial...
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Michael McGoldrick is hooked on the Lamont School of MusicMichael McGoldrick

Michael McGoldrick's love of DU's Lamont School of Music has inspired him to devote significant...
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Nicole Saint and Stefani SchulteNicole Saint and Stefani Schulte

Seniors Nicole Saint (left) and Stefani Schulte help restore a mural in Little Theatre. Perched on a second-hand construction scaffold...
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Nagel Art Studios Provide Function and InspirationRalph and Trish Nagle

One work of Austin Zucchini‐Fowler is striking both in size and in artistry, and it would not have been possible in...
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Michael "Arron" StreetMichael "Arron" Street

Unique from many undergraduate students, I am married to a military service member and father to a son. My wife is often away from...
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eBrochure Request Form

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A charitable bequest is one or two sentences in your will or living trust that leave to University of Denver a specific item, an amount of money, a gift contingent upon certain events or a percentage of your estate.

an individual or organization designated to receive benefits or funds under a will or other contract, such as an insurance policy, trust or retirement plan

"I, [name], of [city, state, ZIP], give, devise and bequeath to University of Denver [written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property] for its unrestricted use and purpose."

able to be changed or cancelled

A revocable living trust is set up during your lifetime and can be revoked at any time before death. They allow assets held in the trust to pass directly to beneficiaries without probate court proceedings and can also reduce federal estate taxes.

cannot be changed or cancelled

tax on gifts generally paid by the person making the gift rather than the recipient

the original value of an asset, such as stock, before its appreciation or depreciation

the growth in value of an asset like stock or real estate since the original purchase

the price a willing buyer and willing seller can agree on

The person receiving the gift annuity payments.

the part of an estate left after debts, taxes and specific bequests have been paid

a written and properly witnessed legal change to a will

the person named in a will to manage the estate, collect the property, pay any debt, and distribute property according to the will

A donor advised fund is an account that you set up but which is managed by a nonprofit organization. You contribute to the account, which grows tax-free. You can recommend how much (and how often) you want to distribute money from that fund to the University or other charities. You cannot direct the gifts.

An endowed gift can create a new endowment or add to an existing endowment. The principal of the endowment is invested and a portion of the principal’s earnings are used each year to support our mission.

Tax on the growth in value of an asset—such as real estate or stock—since its original purchase.

Securities, real estate, or any other property having a fair market value greater than its original purchase price.

Real estate can be a personal residence, vacation home, timeshare property, farm, commercial property or undeveloped land.

A charitable remainder trust provides you or other named individuals income each year for life or a period not exceeding 20 years from assets you give to the trust you create.

You give assets to a trust that pays our organization set payments for a number of years, which you choose. The longer the length of time, the better the gift tax savings to you. When the term is up, the remaining trust assets go to you, your family or other beneficiaries you select. This is an excellent way to transfer property to family members at a minimal cost.

You fund this type of trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. You can also make additional gifts; each one also qualifies for a tax deduction. The trust pays you, each year, a variable amount based on a fixed percentage of the fair market value of the trust assets. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to the University as a lump sum.

You fund this trust with cash or appreciated assets—and receive an immediate federal income tax charitable deduction. Each year the trust pays you or another named individual the same dollar amount you choose at the start. When the trust terminates, the remaining principal goes to the University as a lump sum.

A beneficiary designation clearly identifies how specific assets will be distributed after your death.

A charitable gift annuity involves a simple contract between you and the University where you agree to make a gift to the University and we, in return, agree to pay you (and someone else, if you choose) a fixed amount each year for the rest of your life.

Personal Estate Planning Kit Request Form

Please provide the following information to view the materials for planning your estate.